themarvelageofcomics
themarvelageofcomics:

Page 3 of AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #33 by Steve Ditko

Amazing Spider-Man #33 is possibly my favorite issue of Spider-Man ever. It’s definitely the culmination of the original run by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko.
It’s the third issue in a storyline where Spider-Man had to track down a rare serum to be used in a cure to save his Aunt May who is dying. The serum ended up being in the hands of Doctor Octopus and after the fight Spider-Man was left pinned under a massive piece of machinery. 

For the first 5 pages of the issue Spider-Man is struggling to lift it. He almost gives up, until he forces himself to do it. He can’t let his Aunt May die after letting his Uncle Ben die (making this a great bookend to his origin).
Here he is realizing he can’t give up.
He spends the next X pages just trying to get out of the collapsing, flooding underwater base.
Ditko’s art has such beautiful motion in it. Here Spider-Man is getting thrown forward by a flood of water.
After he gets to the surface he is attacked by a bunch of Doctor Octopus’s Henchmen. He is so exhausted he doesn’t fight back letting his strength keep him from getting hurt so that he can rest. And then when he starts fighting back he is so out of it he can’t even tell when he won the fight. The moment Spider-Man realizes he’s beaten them all is one of many panels from this story that is etched in my memory.
After he leaves the base it’s off to see Dr. Curt Connors (the man who is sometimes the Lizard) to help make the cure. Spider-Man is a scientist, high school student, photographer, super-hero.
Then he runs into his girlfriend Betty Brant. Before Mary Jane, before Gwen Stacy, there was Betty Brant. A nerd who could never get a girl to notice him, finally met someone and he has to lie to her. She worried that Peter’s job taking photos of Spider-Man was too dangerous (her brother’s dangerous life led to his death) and because of that Peter is too afraid to tell her the truth and that his life is even more dangerous. Though he wants to.
In the end Aunt May lives, Spider-Man goes back to fighting other villains, but Steve Ditko would only draw a handful more issues. This feels like his last issue. This feels like a season finale. 
I love it. I assume only my two brothers read this post and clicked on all the links.

themarvelageofcomics:

Page 3 of AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #33 by Steve Ditko

Amazing Spider-Man #33 is possibly my favorite issue of Spider-Man ever. It’s definitely the culmination of the original run by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko.

It’s the third issue in a storyline where Spider-Man had to track down a rare serum to be used in a cure to save his Aunt May who is dying. The serum ended up being in the hands of Doctor Octopus and after the fight Spider-Man was left pinned under a massive piece of machinery.

For the first 5 pages of the issue Spider-Man is struggling to lift it. He almost gives up, until he forces himself to do it. He can’t let his Aunt May die after letting his Uncle Ben die (making this a great bookend to his origin).

Here he is realizing he can’t give up.

He spends the next X pages just trying to get out of the collapsing, flooding underwater base.

Ditko’s art has such beautiful motion in it. Here Spider-Man is getting thrown forward by a flood of water.

After he gets to the surface he is attacked by a bunch of Doctor Octopus’s Henchmen. He is so exhausted he doesn’t fight back letting his strength keep him from getting hurt so that he can rest. And then when he starts fighting back he is so out of it he can’t even tell when he won the fight. The moment Spider-Man realizes he’s beaten them all is one of many panels from this story that is etched in my memory.

After he leaves the base it’s off to see Dr. Curt Connors (the man who is sometimes the Lizard) to help make the cure. Spider-Man is a scientist, high school student, photographer, super-hero.

Then he runs into his girlfriend Betty Brant. Before Mary Jane, before Gwen Stacy, there was Betty Brant. A nerd who could never get a girl to notice him, finally met someone and he has to lie to her. She worried that Peter’s job taking photos of Spider-Man was too dangerous (her brother’s dangerous life led to his death) and because of that Peter is too afraid to tell her the truth and that his life is even more dangerous. Though he wants to.

In the end Aunt May lives, Spider-Man goes back to fighting other villains, but Steve Ditko would only draw a handful more issues. This feels like his last issue. This feels like a season finale.

I love it. I assume only my two brothers read this post and clicked on all the links.

This is an article about a vine who’s leaves match the leaves of whatever it’s wrapped around - despite only touching the other plants on surface level.

I think that’s pretty cool.

ferniecommaalex

improv4thought asked:

I'm afraid to do a bad scene. People make moves in shows that seem like the wrong move and are probably off game, but nevertheless they still make the move, while I sit on the backline overthinking things. I may be too delicate, or maybe i'm just lazy.

ferniecommaalex answered:

Technically, this isn’t a question. But I think I get what you’re asking.

I would always rather watch a scene that was truly terrible because someone took a big chance and struck out than a scene that is middling because everyone on stage was unwilling to take a chance. At least the former is interesting.

I can say a lot of the normal improv voodoo stuff like trust your instincts, follow the fun etc, etc, but I don’t find those phrases to be particularly actionable as notes. So my advice would just be to make A move. My guess would be that you freeze up because you’re desperately trying to figure out what “THE move” to make is… the one move that’s the “right move.” And the 1st step towards getting rid of that fear is just making A move, any move. There is no such thing as the “right move.” Just moves that work and moves that don’t.

I hate the phrase “There are no mistakes in improv” because we all know that’s not true. If it was, there wouldn’t be bad improv. But what you CAN take from that idea is that you shouldn’t be afraid of mistakes… especially if you’re at a point where you’re still learning and figuring out what kind of improviser you’ll be. If you make decisions in your scene, you’ll be fine. DECIDE what you think the game is, DECIDE how you’re going to play it and DECIDE to make a move to achieve that. That’s really all there is to it. The worst case scenario is that you’re on a different page than the rest of your group, but if you’re really listening, the chances of that are slim. In your next show, have the goal of making decisions at every possible opportunity and then acting on them, and see if that gets you off that backline and into more scenes, good or bad.

Or, maybe you’re just super lazy!

Another great post: 1) Make A move. 2) Don’t be afraid of mistakes.

Hopefully my students have heard me say these things a lot. I know I say the first one a lot and I suspect I need to say the second one more.

jonnymarbles

jonnymarbles:

This is a somewhat sentimental eulogy, you’ve been warned.

Approximately one year ago Elizabeth Noth suggested the name “Hotspur” for our brand new Lloyd team. A name that, being the theatrical romantic I am, resonated with me in the most joyful way. Percy Hotspur is a fire-cracker of a character…

Hotspur was a great team. One of the best I’ve gotten to coach. Up there with Ragnarock and Sandino. All of them were smart, funny performers who made me laugh, worked hard, supported each other and genuinely enjoyed everything everyone else on the team did.

ferniecommaalex
When I am on stage, I want to listen [very] intensely, but I always panic or worry. Is this just something you get better at over time? Or are there exercises to actively work on listening?

(I got this anonymous question that I wanted to answer, but I also trimmed down the question a bit. Hence it appearing as a quote, because Tumblr definitely didn’t want me to be able to alter his or her initial message.)

Panic and worry on stage are dealt with mainly just by performing a ton. That’s just getting your reps in. I wish I had a good shortcut for that, but I don’t. And mileage may vary. Some people just become accustomed to it right away, some take hours and hours and hours of stage time before they even start to be able to calm down enough to really be present in a scene.

It helps me sometimes to remember that to truly actively listen, I need to listen to two different things: 1: what the character is saying and 2: what the improviser is saying. Because, often, there is different crucial information in both and you need to hear and absorb both to get the full scope of what’s going on in the scene. The easy example is, if my scene partner says “Don’t push that button”, I know that her character actively does not want me to push that button, but she, the improviser, is saying “Push it and lets see where the scene goes from there.” But it can be more subtle than that… make sure next time you perform to think about that… listening to both levels of the scene. If you’re consciously aware of doing it, it might make it a bit easier.

Also, most people who struggle with really close listening also tend to play fast… so slow down. Don’t fear silence, don’t fear pauses, and don’t worry if the audience is watching you process something, as long as your character is processing it too. Then, you get to really go over what was just said AND look like you’re a great actor! Win/win!

Lastly, you know what the trick is for making it seem like you’re a great listener in a scene? Just responding with your honest response. The literal first thing you thought of when your scene partner spoke. Easier said than done, I know. But 9 times out of 10, that will get you way further in the scene. If you find you can’t do that, make sure it’s not because you’re busy thinking about what to say next rather than listening while your scene partner is speaking.

(via ferniecommaalex)

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another great question & answer from Alex Fernie.

so many good points that I find myself saying over and over again. Don’t be afraid of silence. Listen to the scene, not just the dialogue and the last part is huge. If you are thinking of what to say next instead of listening (to everything - words, actions, emotions) you are making it harder on yourself.